Thursday, February 3, 2011

Advice Illustrated

From: ://www.slate.com/id/2283596/pagenum/all/#p2

Letter 1 is from a mom who likes her easy-to-manage son more than his older and more difficult sister. Is she evil? Prudie gives some probably-OK advice.
My take: you're a bad mother. Now what?

Letter 2 is from a former druggie slut whose brother and SIL keep talking about her former slutty ways. Their parents won't get involved. Prudie says: "Among your brother's offenses are reading your e-mail, making its content known to everyone, booting you from his wedding party, and spreading gossip about your personal life." She also advises getting LW's pastor in the loop to tell off brother.
I say: I wouldn't bother, and just take Prudie's last bit of advice about leaving the room whenever they open their trap. Also say things like: "you put your cock in that woman's twat, and you think you're in a position to give me lessons about MY behavior?"

Letter 3 is from a father whose wife thinks her future DIL isn't good enough for their precious, beautiful, talented, intelligent, mature, and otherwise generally far-above-average baby boy. By the end of an excessively long answer, Prudie gets to the point: if he has to choose, he'll choose his GF over his mother. Wise mothers don't make their darling baby boys choose.

Letter 4 is worth reading live:


Dear Prudence,
A few years ago, my best friend was going through a rough divorce and said she would never remarry. I told her she would change her mind, so she bet me $1,000 that I was wrong. Needless to say, she remarried within a year. Her new husband knew about the bet, and when they got back from their honeymoon he wrote me a check. I debated for a while about cashing it but thought a bet is a bet and cashed it. I've always felt weird for taking the money and want to pay it back. How do I do that, three years later?
—All Bets Are Off

Dear All,
This is why bets between friends are best if the stakes are a steak dinner and not a month's rent. Write your friend a card, enclose a check for $1,000, and say it makes you really happy to acknowledge her third anniversary to the love of her life—a man who's willing to write a check for a foolish obligation—by canceling out her payment for your prescient prediction.
—Prudie


I have nothing better to say. I would have cashed it too, and then written a new check for the same amount. After deducting the cost of the wedding present to the happy couple.

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